Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

"the aim of every artist is to arrest motion..." -Faulkner
    0 0
  • 10/01/17--04:00: Overtime: Sep 25 – Oct 1
  • More stories from the week that ended Oct 1 (click on bolded words for more information):
    • Images and information for Cheyenne Julien's Homegrown exhibition now up on Smart Objects site.
    • RIP: Jim Walrod (1968 - 2017).
    • RIP: Marian Horosko, who passed away at the age of 92.
    • RIP: Valton Tyler, who passed away at the age of 73.
    • RIP: Carolus Enckell (1945–2017).
    • Ghost Ship warehouse owner Chor Ng receives $3mil. insurance payout from deadly fire.
    • Puerto Rican art spaces, like everyone else on the island, significantly affected by hurricanes.
    • Guggenheim withdraws three works featuring live animals from its China exhibition due to threats. How four exhibitions included  art with animals without facing protests.
    • Vandals attack and spray a swastika on Nicole Eisenman's Sculpture Projects Münster installation.
    • Harry Blain sued by fromer Sedition business partners for £500k.
    • Activists occupy Berlin's Volksbühne theater, resisting city's gentrification, and protesting investors.
    • Ben Davis explains Why the Guggenheim’s Controversial Dog Video Is Even More Disturbing Than You Think.
    • The coming congressional attack on the US's Antiquities Act of 1906.
    • Deborah de Robertis to face trial for exposing herself in front of the Mona Lisa.
    • Vito Schnabel arrested and charged with distribution and manufacture of shrooms at Burning Man.
    • Police storm Volksbühne Theater in Berlin to remove From Dust to Glitter art collective.
    • Manhattan District Attorney says antiquity seized from the Met should be returned to Lebanon.
    • Linda Macklowe accused of lowballing value of her art collection in order to get more money in divorce.
    • The death of the Pier 55 project in Hudson River Park.
    • The art world reacts to Germany’s alarming election results and rise of AfD.
    • Jean Nouvel defends treatment of workers at Louvre Abu Dhabi.
    • Artists Against the Immigration Ban send posters in response to President Donald Trump’s immigration ban.
    • Japanese court rules that tattoos are not art.
    • Rubens' Duke of Buckingham rediscovered and restored after "missing" for 400 years.
    • How a street mural in LA set a precedent for the California Art Preservation Act.
    • Case of Matisse’s heirs claiming two cut-outs worth $4.5mil. may be decided soon.
    • David Hockney says that losing his hearing helped to improve his art.
    • Gavin Brown’s Enterprise hosts fundraiser for Puerto Rico, organized By Rirkrit Tiravanija.
    • Saudi artists speak out over new law giving women the right to drive.
    • Observers believe that Beirut’s art scene is in the midst of a reawakening.
    • Nude sketch may be preparatory study for Mona Lisa painting.
    • The opening of the Zeitz Museum.
    • New York Times writes about Yayoi Kusama's museum in Tokyo.
    • Universal Hip-Hop Museum to open in the Bronx.
    • Thelma Golden’s missiom for the Studio Museum. She reveals renderings of the museum's David Adjaye-designed future space.
    • Colin Kaepernick's jersey to hang in MoMA.
    • Marilyn Minter and Andrianna Campbell's "Anger Management" at the Brooklyn Museum.
    • V&A and Royal Opera House to bring opera to the masses.
    • Pompeii to build contemporary art collection as artists invited to create works using archaeological fragments.
    • Canada inaugurates first national Holocaust memorial in Ottawa.
    • Obama Foundation Fellowship seeking applicants for fellowship opportunities.
    • Italy launching new Caravaggio research institute with support from Fendi.
    • Museums move into Moscow's huge Soviet-era fairground at VDNH.
    • Agnes Gund donates major works to the Cleveland Museum of Art.
    • Akron Art Museum receives $8mil. grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.
    • Jerry Yang pledges $25mil. to the Asian Art Museum.
    • Cheryl and Haim Saban pledge $50mil. to Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.
    • Augustus Casely-Hayford is the new director of the National Museum of African Art.
    • Kathy Halbreich to become director of Rauschenberg Foundation.
    • Artnet interviews the Guggenheim’s Alexandra Munroe.
    • Andrew Russeth writes about the summer's shows in Venice, Athens, Kassel, Münster, and Marl.
    • The Art Newspaper looks at the Turner Prize show. Artnet also reviews the show.
    • 7 well-known artists speak about their favorite works at the Met.
    • Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo to launch Madrid foundation to show her art collection.
    • Yoko Ono selling her Basquiat painting at Sotheby's auction.
    • Sotheby's to auction Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, which focuses on works on paper.
    • MCA Chicago and Nasher Museum of Art are the inaugural winners of the Sotheby’s Prize.
    • Breakfast at Tiffany’s script sold at Christie’s for $847k goes to Tiffany's.
    • South China Morning Post writes about Christie's sale in Shanghai.
    • Spring/Break Art Show's upcoming theme is Stranger Comes to Town.
    • Tim Schneider writes about art fair alternatives.
    • Susannah Rosenstock on what to do in Toronto during Art Toronto.
    • A look at the current market for Pat Steir's work.
    • Bill Powers staging one-night only shows at Café Henrie.
    • £100k Freelands Award championing female artists goes to Lis Rhodes at Nottingham Contemporary.
    • Collectors living with difficult to present and maintain artwork.
    • Claes Oldenburg to exhibit first show of new works in 12 years.
    • Artnet profiles Roselyn Drexler.
    • Interview with Robert Longo.
    • Basquiat's relationship with music.
    • Race issues in the figurative paintings of Jordan Casteel and Celeste Dupuy-Spencer.
    • Artnet interviews Matthew Brannon about his Vietnam series.
    • Shelley Holcomb featured and interested in Posture Magazine.
    • W Magazine interviews Takashi Murakami.
    • Richard Prince's new work at Galerie Max Hetzler.
    • Gucci interviews Coco Capitán about her work with Gucci.
    • How Rodney Graham helped Akris find inspiration for its latest collection.
    • Profile of George Gittoes, who has been painting portraits of Julian Assange.
    • 20 public art shows coming to New York this fall.
    • 12 everyday things that began as artworks.
    • Artnet lists 12 influencers to follow on Instagram.
    • How two directors, 125 artists, and Van Gogh fans made Loving Vincent the world’s first painted feature film.
    • Artnet looks at Jim Carrey's artwork.
    • Floyd Mayweather reveals 8-foot portraits of himself and of Conor McGregor in his Beverly Hills mansion.

    0 0
  • 10/04/17--21:29: Streets: Invader (Hong Kong)
  • Invader recently completed his 7th "invasion" wave of Hong Kong with the placement of 32 of his signature tile-based work in and around Habour City (known for their support of artists). Situated next to the stunning views of Victoria Harbor and looking across to the iconic skyline of Hong Kong Island, the largest shopping and dining destination in HK is now even more a must-visit with the announcement that they would preserve all the space invaders that the French street artist has installed on their walls. Take a look at a few more of the pieces below... Discuss Invader here.

    0 0
  • 10/08/17--04:00: Overtime: Oct 2 – Oct 8
  • More stories from the week that ended Oct 2 (click on bolded words for more information):
    • Whitney Museum unveils plans for David Hammons public artwork in the Hudson.
    • RIP: S.I. Newhouse Jr., who passed away at the age of 89. Artnet has a remembrance.
    • RIP: Vern Blosum, who passed away at the age of 81.
    • RIP: Robert Delpire, who passed away at the age of 91.
    • Court to determine if US victims in Jerusalem can seize antiquities on loan to US museum as recompense.
    • Car jumps pavement and hits pedestrians near London's Natural History Museum.
    • Oxford removes portrait of Aung San Suu Kyi.
    • Francis Bacon painting, the star lot of Christie's auction, fails to find a buyer.
    • Marina Abramović abandons plans to open Marina Abramović Institute due to fundraising failure.
    • Dr. Seuss Museum to replace mural after complaints that it depicted racist Chinese stereotype.
    • The Musée du Louvre has withdrawn Atelier Van Lieshout's Domestikator from its Tuileries Gardens.
    • Auguste Renoir painting stolen from an auctioneer in a Paris suburb the day before it was due to be sold.
    • Snapchat reveals Jeff Koons project a day early.
    • Yayoi Kusama bans Vice's Dexter Thomas from her studio.
    • The story of when four guards at Rikers Island decided to steal and subsequently destroy an original Dalí.
    • British museums missing at least £1mil. worth of items.
    • Theresa May attacked for wearing bracelet decorated with renowned communist Frida Kahlo.
    • documenta CEO Annette Kulenkampff  discusses budget controversy.
    • Andrew Hunter on why he quit the Art Gallery of Ontario. AGO director Stephan Jost responds to his criticism.
    • Artnet covers Stefan Simchowitz's Facebook rant. He rants about the article about his Facebook rant on Facebook.
    • The Guardian asks What's the biggest question facing artists today?.
    • Debate on whether Donald Trump’s tax plan would be a bonanza for the art world.
    • Palmyra Lion of al-Lat statue damaged by IS now restored and installed in Damascus.
    • How museums in Puerto Rico are recovering after the hurricanes.
    • David Geffen pledges record $150mil. for new LACMA building.
    • Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris opens Oct 3.
    • Andrew Goldstein interviews Alexandra Munroe.
    • MoMA names Ana Janevski curator of performance and media art.
    • David Bowie retrospective coming to New York at the Brooklyn Museum.
    • The Institute of Arab and Islamic Art adds five artists, writers, and curators to its advisory committee.
    • Dad donates Native American robe to Sealaska Heritage Institute after daughter raises concerns.
    • Jackson Pollock's only mosaic now on view at Washburn Gallery.
    • London’s new Greenwich Peninsula development will host a purpose-built design district.
    • Musuems collecting history as it happens.
    • The rise of the made-for-Instagram museum concept.
    • Marco Cochrane nude woman sculpture shown at Burning Man may travel to National Mall.
    • John Jay College of Criminal Justice exhibits work made by Guantánamo Bay prisoners.
    • The Art Newspaper analyzes at Christie's Masterpieces of Design and Photography and Up Close sales.
    • Christie's uses assistance from aquatic experts to install Damien Hirst work.
    • Bartholomäus Spranger painting once owned by Curt Glaser to be auctioned by Christie's.
    • The Art Newspaper analyzes Christie's evening sale of contemporary art.
    •  Ru guanyao brush washer ceramic sells for record $37.7mil. at Sotheby’s Hong Kong.
    • Sotheby’s to hold first auction sale in Dubai.
    • Jacques Grange’s art, furniture, and antiques collection to be sold at Sotheby's.
    • Marc Chagall work at Sotheby's may break the record for the artist.
    • Roy Lichtenstein’s Female Head, from collection of Elizabeth Rea, to be offered at auction by Sotheby’s.
    • Artnet writes about Sotheby's evening sale of contemporary art.
    • Artnet analyzes Sotheby's Postwar and Contemporary Photo Sale.
    • Artinfo has a Q&A with Sotheby's Alex Branczik.
    • Gurr Johns purchases Dreweatts and Bloomsbury for £1.25mil.
    • Art Basel signs five-year lease with Miami Beach Convention Center.
    • Judd Tully provides us with a Frieze auction week preview. Artists over 60 exhibiting at Frieze. Frieze week events for everyone. Artnet writes about explicit feminist art at the fair. Artnet's choices for the 10 best booths. The market for political art at the fair. Museums taking patrons to Frieze. Tate buys work from the fair. Frieze on a budget. A sales report from Frieze. The Art Newspaper reports on sales from the fair.
    • 10 works to buy at Frieze Masters for under $1mil. Julian Schnabel at the fair.
    • A look at the market for Josef Albers's work.
    • Art Legacy Planning forms to provide services for those in need of art estate and foundation planning.
    • Steven Murphy makes six big hires for his advisory enterprise, Murphy & Partners.
    • Nicholas Logsdail on highlights from 50 years of Lisson Gallery.
    • Tim Schneider on Why Art Basel’s New Ethics Rules Are Good News for the Market (and Other Insights).
    • Artnet profiles Bob Rennie.
    • CNN on the new generation of Chinese art collectors.
    • Serkan Özkaya's theory on Marcel Duchamp's final work.
    • Artnet profiles Louise Fishman.
    • Shepard Fairey's mural in progress in Costa Mesa, CA.
    • Scott Indrisek interviews Amanda Ross-Ho.
    • Anh Do wins 2017 Archibald People’s Choice Award.
    • Josh Kline's show at Modern Art.
    • Shana Nys Dambrot reviews Billy Al Bengston's Dentos 1965 - 1970 at Parrasch Heijnen Gallery.
    • Jake and Dinos Chapman's exhibition of suicide vests at Blain Southern.
    • David Salle on how to look at his work. An interview with the artist.
    • Artreview writes about Tal R's Sexshops show at Victoria Miro.
    • Snapchat teams up with Jeff Koons on augmented reality sculpture project.
    • Ai Weiwei selling editioned sculpture and print on eBay for charity.
    • Seven shows in London to see during Frieze week. Artnet's picks for The 15 Best Shows to See in London During Frieze Week. Why London galleries exhibit at Frieze in their hometown.
    • Artnet's 5 Exciting Young Artists to Watch at Sunday Art Fair.
    • 24 New York gallery shows to see this October.
    • 14 experts weigh in on what the most iconic artwork of the 21st century is.
    • Interview with Jim Carrey about his visual art.
    • Interview with Julia Stiles about playing a curator/art advisor in a film.
    • 250 boxes of Marina Abramović macarons available at Ladurée in London’s Harrods.
    • Friends With You limited edition lenticular print now available in their web shop.
    • Anger Management items available in Brooklyn Museum Shop web shop.

    0 0

    NYC-based artist Daniel Arsham along with footwear & clothing designer and owner-operator of Kith, Ronnie Fieg, recently teamed up for their newest project that will open doors on October 11th. Arsham/Fieg Gallery will launch with a solo show by Haroshi (featured) who will introduce his newest series of Guzo figurines which were introduced earlier this year at Nanzuka Gallery in Tokyo (covered). With his exceptional work process and skilled craftsmanship, the Japanese artist is a perfect match for a debut show in a gallery operated by the likes of Arsham and Fieg. Both known as aficionados in the domains they work in, they will surely bring some groundbreaking works to their newest creative space. Simply titled Gallery Show, the exhibition will consist of new sculptural pieces experimenting with the possibilities of the peculiar medium - discarded skateboard decks. We got a chance to have a peek inside artist's Tokyo studio as he was preparing the show, and talk with him about the meaning behind the work he produced for it. AM: How different is this show from your Guzo show in Tokyo? Haroshi: Basically, it's almost same exhibition, but the upcoming exhibition in NY will include five new pieces of Guzo. The rest of the works are pieces shown at the exhibition in Tokyo, which are loaned from the collectors who acquire them. AM: Is the work based on replicating existing figures or inventing your own? Haroshi: Guzo series is based on Dōsojin, a kind of kami (spirit) from Japanese religious belief. It is an icon which I made up through mixing various views of the other religions. It is said that kami is everywhere around the corners of the streets in Japan, and all objects, places possess some kind of spirit. That is interesting, isn’t it? AM: Definitely. Except from using skateboards as material, are any of the pieces thematically skateboarding related? Haroshi: I believe that no one can understand pain in the real sense unless you experience it. I think Jesus Christ became a messenger of God because he bore the pain instead of us. Moreover, the reason why Buddhist monks practice religious austerities is to understand the pain that people bear. I have been thinking for years that skateboards are being destined to be hurt over and over again, to be thrown away in tatters at the end. So in that sense, I thought it would be the most powerful kami if I make kami from it. And I suppose creating this kind of thing is our role. AM: Did you plan any edition releases for this show? Haroshi: I will release a new 3D lenticular print which has 3 images of Guzo switched as it is viewed from different angles! I have loved this kind of low-tech stuff since I was a kid. It will be available in an edition of only 20 pieces, each framed in acrylic box. Discuss Haroshi here.

    0 0

    It looks like Jen Stark recently completed a mural in the downtown LA arts district (1828 Conway Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90065), her largest to date. Entitled Chromatic Cascade, the impressive piece spans two walls on the facade of a building and measures 27 x 200 ft. Featuring bold colors and intricate patterning, the wall painting is a classic example of Stark's psychedelic drippy imagery, one of the reoccurring motifs in her work. Discuss Jen Stark here.

    0 0
  • 10/10/17--21:32: Streets: Swoon (Cincinnati)
  • While in town for her exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Swoon (interviewed) took some time yesterday to make her mark on the streets. As per her usual practice, the Brooklyn-based artist wheat paste some cut paper pieces in the alley right next to The Findlay Market and in the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Take a look at more photos below... Photo credit: Chris Breeden. Discuss Swoon here.

    0 0
  • 10/15/17--04:00: Overtime: Oct 9 – Oct 15
  • More stories from the week that ended Oct 15 (click on bolded words for more information):
    • Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi, which could sell for over $100mil., to be auctioned at Christie’s. Eight things to know about the painting.
    • RIP: Holly Block (1958–2017). Bronx Museum launches fund in honor of Block.
    • US government withdraws from UNESCO, creating profound implications for cultural institutions.
    • Event at 356 S Mission cancelled due to protests from anti-gentrifiers.
    • Photos comparing black people from Africa with continent’s wild animals pulled after accusations of racism.
    • Philippe Méaille withdraws works he loaned to MACBA museum, citing concerns following independence vote.
    • Omer Fast’s take on Chinatown at James Cohan Gallery angers community organizations.
    • Charles Schulz's home burns down in California fires.
    • Harvey Weinstein never paid for $100k Cecily Brown work he bought at Planned Parenthood’s charity auction.
    • Hollywood & Highland censors Erika Rothenberg sculpture in response to Weinstein scandal.
    • Brazil arts institutions under attack following widespread criticism of a performance at MAM.
    • The Massachusetts attorney general investigating deaccessioning of works by Berkshire Museum.
    • Alfredo Jaar condemns CIA torture chambers as he unveils his “black site” installation in Yorkshire.
    • Why there are so few great modern and contemporary art collections in Spain.
    • James Whitely files $1mil. fraud claim against dealer Atam Sahamnian.
    • Tensions mount between Artist Pension Trust and its contributing artists.
    • State Street Global Advisors, orchestrator of Fearless Girl campaign, settles gender discrimination lawsuit.
    • Market for Italian art may be running out of steam.
    • Eberhard Kornfeld speaks to the media for the first time about Cornelius Gurlitt.
    • Eli Broad retires from public life.
    • John Oliver makes the case for tearing down Confederate monuments in the US.
    • Locals fight to retain (a more durable) Eisenman fountain following Sculpture Projects Münster.
    • Martin Roth exhibition to proceed at QM Gallery Al Riwaq despite partial blockade against Qatar.
    • Alyson Baker to step down from her post as executive director of the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.
    • Jonathan T.D. Neil on why galleries should adjust and balance to demands.
    • Reappraisal of Ruth Asawa’s wire works, courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery.
    • Auction houses finding new ways to survive.
    • Mexico's galleries working together to help each other recover after earthquake.
    • City of Kassel is negotiating with Olu Oguibe to keep his monumental obelisk.
    • Looted ancient marble bull’s head loaned to the Met to be returned to Lebanon.
    • US returns 95 works from Edemar Cid Ferreira's collection to Brazil.
    • Gerhard Richter, Anish Kapoor, and Neo Rauch, make the list of Germany’s richest people.
    • Five leading US scholars and curators pick the nation’s greatest memorial sculptures.
    • Proceeds from sale of Basquiat’s Red Skull will fund new charter schools in New Jersey and Miami.
    • 26 influential art world figures weigh in on whom the most influential artists of the last century are.
    • Tristram Hunt calls for Exhibition Road to be fully pedestrianized after 11 injured in accident.
    • New Museum selects Rem Koolhaas to design expansion on the Bowery.
    • Christopher Knight reviews Giovanni Bellini: Landscapes of Faith in Renaissance Venice at the Getty.
    • Beijing’s UCCA will now be a nonprofit run by director Phillips Tinari, after it was sold to investors.
    • Tate St Ives’s cliffside extension set to boost local economy by £10.5mil. a year.
    • Artnet looks at Frank Gehry-designed Guggenheim Bilbao, 20 years later.
    • MFA Boston gets gifts of 17th-century Netherlandish art, with work by Rubens, Rembrandt, and van Dyck.
    • ICP plans to move for the second time in two years.
    • Smithsonian's Archives of American Art acquires the records of Artists Talk on Art (ATOA).
    • Two would-be rap museums in Harlem and in The Bronx are battling to become NY's first.
    • Barbara Kruger's commission for Performa 17 announced.
    • Alistair Hudson named director of the Whitworth and Manchester Art Gallery.
    • Artnet asks Who Are the Most Influential Curators of the Last Century?
    • Artnet interviews Paola Antonelli.
    • Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture granted $250k by Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.
    • Tim Schneider on why museums are at a disadvantage over private collectors and other issues.
    • Superflex’s One Two Three Swing! at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall.
    • Artnet looks at Dalí/ Duchamp at London’s Royal Academy.
    • Desert X returns in 2019.
    • White Columns to move to new location next to Whitney Museum in New York.
    • Stars of British art world donate works to Sotheby's sale for Grenfell fire survivors.
    • Emilie Volka joins Artcurial as the new director in Italy.
    • Newhouse family appoints Tobias Meyer as representative for S.I. Newhouse Jr. art collection.
    • Gary Nader to sell work from his collection during Art Basel Miami Beach in order to fund his museum.
    • Artsy's sales report for Frieze London and Frieze Masters.
    • Kenny Schachter's adventures in London during Frieze.
    • Artnet interviews .Art domain founder Ulvi Kasimov.
    • Artnet interviews Michael Sherman about moving from the mayor’s office to the auction house.
    • Firstsite in Colchester, Essex to re-stage Hauser & Wirth’s fictional Bronze Age museum Frieze booth.
    • Tracey Emin, Carl Freedman and Jonathan Viner to establish Margate arts district.
    • The Banksy economy.
    • Larry's List interviews Hong Gyu Shin.
    • Mary Weatherford now represented by Gagosian Gallery.
    • Luhring Augustine now represents Oscar Tuazon.
    • Judith Bernstein joins Paul Kasmin Gallery’s roster.
    • Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Trevor Paglen among recipients of Macarthur Genius Grant.
    • JR hosts picnic across US-Mexico border.
    • Artnet interviews Anne Imhof.
    • Artnet writes about Adam Pendleton's Black Dada.
    • Jori Finkel interviews Judy Chicago.
    • Ai Weiwei's Good Fences Make Good Neighbors project deals with refugee crisis. NY Times reviews his Human Flow.
    • Isa Genzken honored with Kaiserring 2017 award from the city of Goslar.
    • Jeff Koons' new Louis Vuitton Masters collection.
    • Artnet profiles Jordan Casteel.
    • Will Cotton's annual drawing party.
    • Seitu Jones and Richard Schlatter each took home a $200k grand prize at ArtPrize.
    • Smartify app enables users to identify artworks and read about artwork by scanning them with smartphones.
    • Six art gallery-worthy discoveries at New York Comic Con.
    • Sarah Cascone chooses 18 things to see in New York.
    • The Vinyl Factory interviews Justin Strauss.
    • Ten artist-inspired or collaborated fashion collections.

    0 0

    Coinciding with the last day of his scaffolded installation at the US-Mexico border fence (covered), JR (interviewed) organized a gigantic picnic to commemorate the occasion. Setting up a massive table featuring the "eyes of a dreamer," a motif the French artist is famous for, the feast spanned both sides of the fence near Tecante, Mexico and Tecate in California. People from both sides showed up, including Kikito (whose photo was the one used for the installation) and his family, to share food and to support the artist's continued work to highlight social issues. Discuss JR here.

    0 0
  • 10/19/17--22:03: Interviews: Igor Ponosov
  • It would give a certain pleasure to Walter Benjamin if he could know that 81 years from the first publication of his The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, it would be quoted by a Russian artist in a perfectly poetic manner just right on the waters of the Norwegian port city of Stavanger. The artist, Igor Ponosov, through his Too far, Too close artwork, not only reminded us about the “aura” and “unique appearance of a distance,” but also interacted with the viewer through some kind of ritual, which according to Benjamin should prove the “authenticity” of this work. In early September during Nuart Festival (covered), twice a day people in Stavanger could watch the boat with the “eye test chart” on its sail floating around the city in the distance. It was an art object, performative act, poetical allusion and the critical statement, all at the same time. Igor Ponosov says that it’s an “intradepartmental” critique, since the artwork, which was made for the street art festival actually symbolizes the true distance between modern street art and the people, no matter how close this art may be to them physically. Ponosov is an artist, activist and the author who doesn’t have formal art education. Despite that, his last book was awarded the Sergey Kuryokhin Contemporary Art Award for the “Best Text on Contemporary Art” in 2016. He is the person who’s standing behind the Partizaning.org website and is said to be the first person on Earth who did research on street art in post-soviet territory. Kristina Borhes (KB): What do you do as an artist? Igor Ponosov (IP): I work with the city mostly. I think it’s because the urban environment inspires me a lot. There are many elements, which could be combined within the city; many people to communicate with; a lot of meanings you can work with… It is a very fertile environment for creativity. For instance, there is magnificent nature in Stavanger. It’s a kind of nature, which is very inspirational and desirable, you always dream to get there.  Even before I got here, I knew it will be like that. That’s why the boat is sort of attempt to reach it (nature). Practically, I was staying in the city since I was sailing only around Stavanger, but anyway I’ve became a little closer to its nature.  It was an artistic endeavor to experience the nature. At the same time, it was a chance to tell the people that the city is not only those industrial buildings in “growth decay”, but also everything around Stavanger. And I guess most people were inspired by it. They saw that it’s possible to make something even on the water. KB: Since you’re working with the context of the place. Did you notice something specific regarding the public space of Stavanger? What thoughts it provoked? IP: Every city has its specific context. What I’ve noticed here is a very comfortable and safe environment. Again, nature plays a big role, but also there are not many cars in the city, not many people… Perhaps, Stavanger has just the right amount of people and cars which should be in such a small city. That’s why it’s very comfortable to live here. I never saw a cop here and I don’t know where the police department is (I have a doubt that it exists at all), but there’s a strong personal impression of safeness in this city. There are no window grates here, no fences… It is very noticeable, especially when you come from Russia. I’m always renting an apartment in Moscow. Usually, it is on the first or second floor and every time there are grates on windows there. You always feel this border, living as if behind the fence. Once, I even made the design of the window grate as an object in the Russian city and I thought it could be interesting to make one here someday. It’s a quite clear and understandable moment in Russia, but how would people react to it in Stavanger? And is it even possible here? Actually, it’s an important part of any project – to examine how acceptable your idea is in some specific place. KB: How you came to an idea of the Too far, too close artwork? IP: Once I was in Nizhny Novgorod, a city with the widest river Volga. This river inspired me a lot, just like Norwegian nature. There are some islands just right on the river. In the frame of an art residency, I’ve asked to bring me to the one of those islands, so I could live there for a couple of days in the tent. I haven’t done anything extra special, but it was a very interesting practice of experiencing the city. You’re kinda in the city, but at the same time you’re not.  Just in the middle of  “nature” still you can see the urban landscape, city lights, advertisement on the shopping mall, you can hear the church bells… It was definitely an interesting practice. And I wanted to continue it here, but at the same time I wanted to create an object. The object which will be quite poetical, a bit critical, absurd and useful in a way. This is how the image of the sail with the “eye test chart” was born. The “message” on the sail is quite absurd, but at the same time it is somewhat useful, because the boat was sailing at a specific distance from the city, so people could make an eye test. KB: Tell me more about your “intradepartmental” critique. What do you think is wrong with the street art and muralism? IP: What concerns me a lot is reproduction of mural art. Walter Benjamin raised the question about the “reproduction” and the “aura” of art back in 30’s… The issue is still actual regarding the context of street art festivals. I don’t see the meaning in massive production of all these abstracts or decorative murals. Most of them are out of context… I’m always trying to be critical and my work “Too far, too close” symbolizes the murals, which are too far from the people because of the abstract message they deliver (just as my sail with an eye test chart), even though they are so close physically to people on the streets. In fact, most of the street art works nowadays are very flat images. Very often it is just a depiction of a simple object. It’s some kind of a trap for the artist. They’re becoming the prisoners of their own style. Imagine that some artist painted a peg, a very well-done huge peg. And maybe this peg even related to the context of that particular place. But all of a sudden everyone started to ask for the same peg in other places. So, artist changes it a bit, but then decides to develop a set: peg, fork and spoon. He will use this set every time, when somebody invites him to paint. This is how artists are getting trapped. And even well-known and respectable artists are reproducing their own sets of objects, characters or animals… It’s cool to see it once, maybe twice, but I don’t agree to look at the same thing with small variations in every single city. I don’t need it neither as an inhabitant, nor as a guest of the city. KB: And you as an artist? IP: As an artist, I don’t like to be the prisoner of the style. It’s not interesting for me to reproduce the same thing. If someone asks me to make another sail, probably I will refuse. There’s no sense in it. KB: Apparently, attending street art festivals is not in your habit. What is so special about the Nuart? There should be something, since you’re here… IP: Yeah, it’s not in my habit at all. Usually, I don’t take part in street art festivals. In fact, I’m trying to escape the label - “street art” artist.  It’s not that I’m ashamed or something. Many people have the opinion that there are “street art” artists and the “true” artists. I don’t agree with that for sure. But still this “street art” label became mainstream and it provokes associations such asa  permanent reproduction of facades, superficial images, lack of work with the context, unfortunately. Frankly saying, I would like it to be different. In my book Art and the city, I’ve tried to find the examples in order to disprove it, but still one way or another this mainstream scene already exists. That’s why street art festivals are not very useful for me personally. I consider myself as just an artist and yes, I like to work with the city, but only because it’s a very fertile environment, nothing more. I’ve came to Nuart festival, because I consider it as one of the oldest street art festivals and it was curious to kinda watch it from the inside. This festival is changing through development and the line-up of this year is a good proof of that. It is very diverse and interesting. KB: Ok, let’s talk about your Art and the city book. It was quite resonant on post-soviet territory. How was it started? IP: I’ve been doing analysis and systematization of the street art starting since 2004. It started with my first website – “Visual Artifacts.” At that time in post-soviet territory, there wasn’t even such a term as “street art.” Well, there was something, but certainly no websites that could present information about it. By that time, I was already bored by tagging. I mean, at that stage for me as an artist it wasn’t interesting to tag in Moscow anymore.  So, I started to explore new practices in the context of the city. I was searching for artists on the web, collecting their profiles and then presenting them on my website. Almost immediately, I’ve got an idea about the book. For the next few years, I’ve published 3 books - the series called “Objects.. I’ve made everything by myself in those books and each one became better. It was quite a long process and from time to time I had the feeling as if street art only begins, but at the next moment it immediately dies… At least in Russia. For quite a long time I was doing the lectures and exhibitions regarding the street art topic. In 2012-2013 together with Krill KTO, we’ve been working on the lectures for the university and I thought it could be nice to collect the information obtained through all these years and present it in one single monumental statement - the book. Moreover, there was no such publication in Russia. Well, even on the worldwide scene there are not many books, which systematically explore the wide range of different practices. So, I started to work on the “Art and the city” book. KB: Was is it easy to publish such book in Russia? IP: It appeared to be not that easy… I’ve published the “Objects” trilogy at my own expense. This time, I thought that I already outgrew this stage. There were some sponsors willing to cooperate, but I surely didn’t want advertising in my book. I wanted to work with a publishing house this time. I spend almost a year negotiating with different publishing houses. Some of them agreed but then nothing really happened… I guess most of them just wanted to avoid the risk, it’s always easier to work with something you’ve already tried.  That’s why I decided to do it by myself again. It’s important for me to finish what I’ve started. Moreover, it was interesting for me to try crowdfunding as a tool. So now I’m really happy that it went this way. The crowdfunding campaign lasted for 3 months and it showed me that people are interested in this topic, they are ready to be involved, ready to help. Sure, it demands a titanic effort. I was communicating with the people all the time. I don’t like to use social media, but I had to. Despite that, I proved to myself that people care about my work, it’s important for them. I had big support from the graffiti and street art community. As a matter of fact, I was criticizing some of those artists and organizations, but they supported me anyway. It is valuable. During the campaign, I achieved the goal and even a bit more. It was more than enough to publish a book. I guess I’m trying to prove that one person could do a lot of things. You don’t have to wait until someone notices you, or until you have the money or something else. Just start doing something. KB: Regarding your refusal from advertising in the book. What is your opinion towards art and sponsorship? It seems like politicians and entrepreneurs are actively re-discovering the “power” of street art. I guess both of us can come up with hundreds of dismal examples from Russia and Ukraine.     IP: I’m trying to stay away from the brands, commercial or political organizations. It’s important for me to keep my statement pure. I can’t imagine my boat sailing here under the name of some brand for instance. For me this kind of thing is unacceptable, because in that case it’s only advertising, nothing more. Although, I know many artists who are absolutely ok with such things. It’s their choice. As an artist I don’t care who’s sponsoring other artists, but as curator I prefer to work with artists which are motivated by themselves rather than by sponsors. Usually, you can feel it on the personal level: sometimes it’s just some single cooperation and it doesn’t affect the artist’s practice, the other time you can feel its domination throughout artist’s work. Capitalism takes every underground culture and converts it in the mainstream. This is what really happened with the street art. It’s a well-established practice and artists are only cogs in its wheel. KB: As you’ve mentioned earlier, sometimes you feel that street art dies. Some of intellectuals already declared the death of graffiti, death of street art, or death of Postmodernism… So now we have Schacter’s “Intermural Art” or “Post-Street Art” from Martyn Reed as the new terms for the new practices somewhere in the middle of the streets and galleries/museums. Is it really dead? IP: Well, I agree that it is an absolutely a different practice. For me, street art is a grassroots practice, it is illegal, a protest in some way, politically or socially engaged… You can hardly find such messages today… It’s not the same “street art” as it was at the beginning. After I published three of my “Objects” books, I said the same thing about Russian street art, it died for me. I saw no development of street art in the context of Russia. Artists didn’t pay attention to local context. Most of these practices came from the West, frequently it was just reproduction of Western images. Later I had an impression that it revived for a certain moment. It was 2011, when some protest things appeared, artists in Russia started to work with local context. I still see them now, but prefer to remove the “street art” label from their practices. Most likely, the “Art and the City” book is kinda the final point in my street art “digging”... This topic became very mainstream, some kind of niche or even “ghetto” in the context of contemporary art.  From time to time, contemporary art institutions are trying to represent the processes, which are going on within the street art, but usually they don’t understand a thing about it. They will randomly pick something from the surface and put it into the museum, or biennale. As a rule, it’s something like “we will give you that far corner, spray something on it.” In the end, it looks like some roadside... And I don’t like it, because if you’re an artist – please represent yourself equally with other artists. If you prefer to work with the city context that’s ok, but why do you have to label yourself? Photo credit: Kristina Borhes and the artist